Bowhill Lane Residence

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Residential Design, Architecture
Cohlmeyer Architecture

The core of the home is the great hall––reminiscent of refectories in English universities––that extends from a screened porch through a generous sitting area, a central kitchen, and dining space, to a broad staircase leading up to a family library.

A tapestry of glass and stone, this spacious home, nestled in a park-like setting, is flawlessly elegant and thoroughly welcoming.

The design’s distinctive cross shape creates a spacious, multipurpose great hall at the core of the house marked by a grand staircase that leads to an intimate mezzanine. Four wings extend from the great hall and define four separate outdoor courtyards. Abundant natural ventilation and lighting, combined with several energy-saving technologies, make this home remarkably energy efficient.

With copper eavestroughs, locally sourced limestone, and custom metal and woodwork, this home has cottage warmth and space for a lively extended family.

 

The home is expected to be net-zero in energy consumption. The house design capitalizes on natural ventilation, existing trees and solar panels to increase energy savings.

 

A water-heat-recovery system captures heat from waste water and pre-warms the water entering the house. A filtration system removes contaminants.

An airy porch overlooking a forested area encloses the end of one of the wings created by the cross-shaped design.

 

An open kitchen and garden window lie at the centre of the great hall.

 
Creating a single gathering space for family and friends was the initial concept for this house plan. The result was a great hall with dining, kitchen and family spaces on one level connected by a staircase to a library and workspace above. The cross-shaped layout sprang from the clients’ desire for separate and diverse courtyards, rather than a single outdoor area.

Creating a single gathering space for family and friends was the initial concept for this house plan. The result was a great hall with dining, kitchen and family spaces on one level connected by a staircase to a library and workspace above. The cross-shaped layout sprang from the clients’ desire for separate and diverse courtyards, rather than a single outdoor area.

A high level of environmental responsibility was realized through the following: 

  • Building materials were selected to minimize glues and VOCs (volatile organic compounds). Flooring was completed with reclaimed wood.

  • Electricity is supplied primarily by a 36-kilowatt solar voltaic array––the largest in Winnipeg at the time––and supplemented by Manitoba’s hydroelectric system.

  • In the place of natural gas, heating is provided by two air-source heat pumps, enhanced by a high-efficiency wood fireplace.

  • The building envelope exceeds the most stringent requirements for air tightness––0.57 ACH @ 50 pascals.

 
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Credits:
Landscape Architect, Cynthia Cohlmeyer
Structural Engineer, Crosier Kilgour & Partners
Contractor, Sakiyama Construction
Solar Design and Installation, Skyfire Solar
Commissioning Agent, Prairie House Performance

Awards:
Manitoba Masonry Design Awards, Award of Excellence for Single Family Residential Design, 2018


Beautifully and Artfully Crafted